Roys Citroen Traction

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Roys Citroen Traction

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Roys Citroen Traction

Postby Roymattblack » Thu Mar 19, 2015 9:27 am

I've been on this for about a month and so far I've built up the engine and started on the frame.

First – Heller Really should be applauded for attempting to get on the Pocher bandwagon with this enormous kit. It really is a shame nobody else has done something similar.
In many ways, this kit is far more detailed than any Pocher kit has ever been.
Yes, the classic Pocher models have ‘working’ brakes, but the level of actual detail in the Citroen kit compared to any of the Pocher cars is far and away beyond belief.
Even the universal joint ‘spiders’ slide in and out on splined shafts when the suspension moves.

The biggest difference though which takes Pocher into the lead is that this kit is all plastic and goes together with glue. Pochers are primarily nuts and screws assembly.
This kit also has a ‘real’ parts count which exceeds any Pocher.
The big Pocher Rolls Royce’s quote over 3000 parts.
However, that includes umpteen wheel spokes, hundreds of nuts, screws, bolts, washers etc…
The ACTUAL number of model parts is around 800-1000.
The Heller kit has almost 1100.

To begin – The Engine.
Of the three very first parts I cut from the sprue, one needed adjusting and one was broken.
Good start.
After a bit of trimming and repair work, the engine block was put together and then glued to the sump. A bit of credit to Heller - minimal cleaning up needed.
Mind you, fitting the two block halves together proved to be quite difficult as there are no locating pins or holes meaning accurate lining up of the parts was a headache because the two pieces move about on the small fixing areas. It was eventually sorted by taping the parts together first, and then running the glue along the inside edges.
Will this prove to be the norm? We shall see.

Next – the cylinder head halves aren’t the same length… One half is about 1mm longer than the other. Not much, but as the plastic is only about 1mm thick, it means the parts don’t line up and one end overlaps the other. Also, both halves were warped.
After some clamping, interior bracing and gluing, the warp was sorted, but the cylinder head bows in at the centre meaning a plasticard block had to be added inside to get a nice straight component.
Sounding more like a Pocher kit every minute.
The engine block end pieces – no locating pins or points. Fitting the various parts together is almost trial and error as there is absolutely NO reference, or way of knowing if the part is in the correct place until other parts are fitted later on. This could mean potential disassembly later if anything is adrift.
DEFINITELY in Pocher territory here!

Gearbox parts, read as above. One thing is for sure and that is that I’m going to need an awful lot of masking tape and clamps at this rate.
Other components were added in a fairly straightforward way, but only after double and triple checking that the position of each part was correct.
There are a lot of different shaped panels and plates that fix to various parts of the engine, and not much in the way of proper guidance as to where they go. You really need to look at any bolts or fixings, and find matching places on the main engine where the bolts line up. Having said that, I’m already really enjoying this kit.

The rocker lid was added easily, as were an assortment of pipes, small plugs and taps, and the starter motor. This kit really does have a plethora of miniscule parts to add. Some pieces are only a millimetre or so in size a realistically need never have been made as separate pieces but no doubt this was done to increase the parts count and to step up the complexity. There are even whole rows of the tiniest hex nuts and bolts imaginable to be glued in place and I could fully understand any builder of this kit who just leaves them out as once added, they hardly notice anyway.
However – being a nit-picker, and knowing it would irritate the life out of me if I omitted a single one of them, they are all being added.
Numerous unnecessary parts did I say?
Fine by me!
Everything on the main engine was painted a dull matt/satin green and a misting of Tamiya smoke. Later on it will get a further weathering and oil staining.

The first thing I did to make the engine look a bit ‘used’ was give the whole thing a coat of ‘Klear’.
This was to give everything a faint sheen as the matt green just looked too matt.
The Klear was applied very roughly with a stiff brush so that it dries with a more mottled finish.
I don’t want it too smooth.

Next, some gloss black was thinned down considerably and was washed in around the various joins, nooks, crannies, nuts and bolts. I didn’t go too heavy with this as I want the engine to look as if it’s in a decent car and gets the occasional service. I Googled lots of pictures of older car engines for reference and was quite surprised to see that in almost all cases, the engines have a greyish-brown hue caused more by dust and dirt than oil.
The next layer of gunge was applied using a watered down mix of brown and tan. The colours were mixed ‘in situ’ to give an uneven look to the dirt, dust and rust.
Again, I didn’t go too heavy with this layer as the engine isn’t meant to be a wreck.
Finally, I added some highlights of light grey, rust brown and black, to accentuate water dribbles, chips in the green paint and heavier oil marks. I also used pencil, suitably smudged, to give some highlights but they don’t show in the pictures.
Hopefully I haven’t over done it…

I’m now on to adding the umpteen other parts to the engine – and there are a LOT.
As I’ve mentioned previously, this is an incredibly detailed model and the number of parts to make up the whole engine just beggars belief. Just looking at the instructions makes me think
‘Pocher would have left that bit off… Pocher would have left that bit out…’
Don’t get me wrong though. I’m an ardent Pocher fan as many of you might have previously guessed but there’s no denying they frequently left out quite a few fairly large parts in the old kits – and still have done so with the new Aventador.
Mind you, I’ve still to come across ANY parts that actually have locating pins, holes, points etc…
Still – it keeps it interesting.

The ancillary parts were assembled with no real trouble. I must say that for such an old kit, the tooling and quality is really top notch. Virtually no flash, pin marks or problems. Also, whatever plastic Heller use, other companies would do well to follow. It glues together easily and the joins seem to set far more quickly than other kits such as those from Revell or Airfix.
It’s a bit of a shame that almost every part of the engine is green as there’s so much detail it seems almost criminal not to highlight it with different colours.
However, the real thing was all green, so green it is.

Frustratingly, the weathering on the engine looks heavy-handed and ‘ott’ in the pictures but in reality, it’s all quite muted.
I did add extra ‘dust’ to the faces of the fan blades as in reality, this is one area that gets very dirty.
Fitting the first drive belt behind the fan was a feat of dexterity – a case of three sets of hands needed.
Onward and upwards.

It’s getting into some seriously eyeball-straining territory now.
There are some utterly miniscule brackets to fix in place, along with ant-sized nuts that have to be added and then to top it all, there are two linkage springs that are fitted.
Can it get worse…?
Yes – you have to make the springs yourself from supplied mega-fine wire.

I’ve added a picture of one bracket and two springs and the entire thing INCLUDING the springs, is around 15mm long!
Once the bracket was assembled it had to be fitted to the gearbox housing BEHIND levers that are already fitted. (Pocher once again)
When the glue was dry the springs were fixed to the location points.
A stiff drink needed after that lot.

The next parts to add were the gear control spindles, levers and rods.
Once again, lovely fine mouldings – except that for some reason only best known to Heller, they supply the two control rods – around 120mm long – made of flexible vinyl!
Also, they are totally warped.
Utterly useless.
I had to carefully cut off the clevis ends, drill them out and fabricate the rod from 1mm copper wire.
Mind you, they now look far better being a more accurate scale thickness than the plastic parts.
The carburettor was assembled next and as is the case of the engine so far, Heller seem to have deliberately made umpteen components to be assembled into one piece, where two or three would suffice.
The carb has 12 pieces and is around 1cm square when built up…
Once assembled it was painted in different shades of ally and silver and weathered down a bit.

The next task was to assemble and fit the inlet and exhaust manifolds.
These are in two parts each which fitted together really well. Using a lot of Googled reference, it’s clear that the inlet manifold is pretty clean, and the exhaust is always rusty.
Mine were painted to represent the same.

Fitting them was pretty simple even though there are 10 MINISCULE nuts to glue in place – they can just be seen in the pictures – green plastic - as I haven’t painted them yet.
Getting the carb and heat shield to fit was a bit of a mission and a fair bit of grinding and fettling of the heat shield underside was needed to get a nice neat fit.
Some weathering to do next…

The water pump was assembled next – another ten parts in a small component.
The hose is made of rubber and had to have the clips picking out in BMF.
The whole thing was then fixed to the engine and once dry, the drive belt was added with no small degree of difficulty.

The engine is fairly complete, until it is installed later on so it’s been put to one side.
Next up is the front chassis frame.
Once again Heller have gone all out to produce as many parts as is humanly possible to create this section and the instructions aren’t exactly clear as to where numerous parts go so it’s a case of testing the bits in several locations to see what is correct with reference to future added parts.

Also, as with the engine, there are NO locating tabs or pins on anything.
I believe this is known as ‘Flemish’ joints – I have no idea why – and although somewhat fiddly, is does make for far more realistic joints, particularly with flat panels.
I found it is easier if the parts are taped together and then thin glue is run along the join.
When the join has set, take the tape off.

Once the main cradle was assembled, another 20-or-so parts were fitted. As before, most of these parts could have been moulded in place but Heller have gone down the road of ‘as many parts as possible’. No complaint from me.
The cradle was sprayed satin black and had a mist coat of matt earth on the lower areas and in the nooks and crannies.
After that the cradle was weathered a bit using silver, matt red and matt brown.

Roy.

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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby Jouko » Thu Mar 19, 2015 10:10 am

The engine looks very good.
Maybe I have to continue my Traction after I have done Aventador ready. Haven't done nothing for it since 2013.
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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby baby_astons » Thu Mar 19, 2015 4:49 pm

great start andrew -
I should take apart the engine on mine - I bought the kit back in the eighties for - believe it or not - around 4 euros in todays money -
someone wanted to get rid of it on a big swap meet (you could buy the kit in a shop then - the first yellow box) and I got it - the engine has been started and a very few other bitsies...
hope hachette will make their 11cv faux cabriolet once the ds21 has finished - have the first 4 test shots here - it's the cars 80 years anniversary!!
building:DB5~E-Type~Testarossa~Aston Vantage V12~Millennium Falcon

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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby Roymattblack » Thu Mar 19, 2015 6:05 pm

.....Andrew?.....
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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby baby_astons » Thu Mar 19, 2015 10:16 pm

well, stupid me sorry roy - the rest is OK :oops:
building:DB5~E-Type~Testarossa~Aston Vantage V12~Millennium Falcon

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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby Julian » Thu Mar 19, 2015 11:14 pm

I've goy to pic 4 with mine....lol .... I need to resume.. :)
If it's Not Broke, Take it apart and make it better

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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby Roymattblack » Tue Mar 31, 2015 6:57 pm

An update - apologies for the 'text heavy' aspect, but I'm aiming to help potential builders.....

Roy.



THE FRONT CHASSIS FRAME – PAGE 9 KIT INSTRUCTIONS
Once again Heller have gone all out to produce as many parts as is humanly possible to create this section and the instructions aren’t exactly clear as to where numerous parts go so it’s a case of testing the pieces in several locations to see what is correct with reference to future added parts.

Also, as with the engine, there are NO locating tabs or pins on anything.
This is known as ‘Flemish’ jointing – I have no idea why – and although somewhat fiddly, is does make for far more realistic joints, particularly with flat panels.
It is easier to build the front cradle if the parts are taped together and then thin glue is run along the join. See the pictures.
When all the joints have set, take the tape off.

The lower centre of the cradle had the somewhat obvious join line covered with very thin sheet plastic. Once painted the result is far better.
The cradle was sprayed satin black and had a mist coat of matt earth on the lower areas and in the assorted recesses.
After that the cradle is weathered down further using silver, matt red and matt brown. These layers were dry-brushed paying attention to raised areas that would be ‘rubbed’ in reality – silver and grey were used here.
Lower areas and places that could collect water and mud were treated to matt brown and matt red to replicate light rusting. Bolt heads/nuts were lightly highlighted with grey or silver.

Again, look at the pictures for colour reference, and to show clearly where smaller parts fit.
The upper and lower arms are assembled and weathered next, and these are fitted to the cradle using fiddly but working spindles so that the suspension will eventually work. The suspension can be built ‘solid’ if required.

Front Suspension.

Assemble the front uprights and fit to the upper and lower ‘A’ arms on each side of the cradle.
Allow these assemblies to dry fully before moving on. Take care with which parts are for the left and right sides.
The rear torsion bar cradle is assembled next and then it comes to fitting the actual torsion bars.
The instructions here are extremely poor and do not explain clearly how this is to be done.
The rear part of the torsion bar frame – parts 466,467,383, and (2x) 214 are all assembled easily.
The small round bushes – 2x 214 are turned inwards at the top. It is important that they stay here.
They could actually be glued in position as any future movement is negligible.

One nylon torsion bar is fitted into the rear support square hole, with the ‘flat’ section at the other end remaining horizontal to the rear support.
The matching lower suspension ‘A’ arm on the main cradle MUST be pulled downwards to its lowest position.
Insert the end of the nylon torsion bar into the locating hole in the lower ‘A’ arm.
This will result in the tear torsion bar frame being at an angle downwards, compared to the main cradle. This is correct.
Now insert the other nylon torsion bar into the rear support, keeping it ‘square’ to the rear support.

The other end of the torsion bar (the front) will now have the flat section at an angle to the main cradle. This is correct.
Pull the corresponding ‘A’ arm downwards as far as it will go. The rear frame should still be angled downwards.
You will see that the nylon torsion bar ‘flat’ that is supposed to fit in the location point on the ‘A’ arm, is not in alignment. This is correct.
You will need to grip the torsion bar near to the front end with a pair of pliers, and twist the torsion bar rotationally, until the flat lines up with the locating hole.
Push the torsion bar fully home.

It sounds very scary, but it actually works.
The front suspension should now work with a good deal of spring.
To summarise:

One torsion bar is fitted with the suspension totally forced downwards.
Then, the other torsion bar has to be twisted around its axis using pliers – and then insert the end in the matching suspension arm.

MAIN FLOOR AND FRONT BULKHEADS – PAGE 9 KIT INSTRUCTIONS

The next assembly to look at is the main floor and bulkheads.

You will probably find that the ‘U’ shaped bulkhead - part 628 - gives a whole new meaning to the word ‘warped’.
On the kit being built here the part literally fitted nowhere. I had to resort to some seriously scary bending, twisting and hot water treatment to get it even close to the right shape.
Then I taped the part in place with Sellotape – masking tape will not hold it.
Then, a serious bead of glue was run around the inside joint. You really DON’T want this part coming adrift later on.
Once the front sidewalls were fitted the whole area was given a coat matt black (after primer) and some dirtying and weathering down with a dust coat of matt earth sprayed on from about 18 inches.
Further weathering was added by dry brushing silver, grey, red oxide (rust) and matt earth.
Again, the pictures make the weathering look quite extensive and heavy but in reality, it isn’t.
Keep the weathering minimal for the best results.

The next task is to fit the front frame and suspension to the main floor.

The instructions here are very poor. Once you work out what is required the assembly is very simple.
The outer ‘ladders’ on the front cradle go to the outside of the engine bay walls.
The torsion bars go to the inside.
The outer ladders are meant to be about 1.5mm above the floor panel from front to back.
Do not try to glue them so they touch the floor. This will pull the ladders out of shape.
Clamp the parts together while the glue dries.
Use PLENTY of glue here as the whole front of the car is supported on these joints. If the joints come apart in the future, the car will literally ‘fold up’ in the middle.

Although test-fitted in the last pictures, the engine ISN'T fitted at this stage.

All the best, Roy.

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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby Julian » Tue Mar 31, 2015 8:31 pm

Superb stuff Roy
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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby Roymattblack » Sat Apr 04, 2015 2:40 pm

More on the build.....



FRONT BULKHEAD DETAILS – PAGE 10 KIT INSTRUCTIONS

There are now many small parts that are fitted inside the engine bay.

Engine supports are built up from 7 parts each which include a rubber stop.
These are identical parts so can be fitted to either side of the engine bay.
Paint and add silver and brown weathering before fitting.
NOTE: These parts are better fitted AFTER the clutch rod assembly described next.

Several small rods, arms and levers are fitted next and again these all fit very well and are very finely moulded parts. It is worth spending a little time removing any seams or sprue marks here as these details really bring the engine bay to life.
Seams and the remnants of sprue joins will spoil the effect.

A very fine spring has to be made as previously described, and then fitted between the engine bay wall and an actuating lever. Weathering applied as per the other parts.
Look closely at the weathering in the engine bay area.
There should be mud, water staining, and some oil, particularly in the lower areas.
Light rusting can be applied at bracket edges and around bolts/nuts.

The clutch and brake pedal assembly is very straightforward to put together but care needs to be taken so that the two pedals are horizontal and level when compared to each other.
The pedal rubbers are weathered using dusty brown and grey.

The clutch control rod assembly (section C – page 10 in the instructions) is fitted to the inner engine bay wall next and comprises some very small parts.
Assembly is quite straightforward but the control rod – part 73 – is another nylon component and should ideally be replaced.
It can be used, but would be better replaced by a piece of 1mm wire with a sharp right-angle bend at one end. The rod collar can be replicated with a short piece of electrical wire sleeve, glued in place approx. 6mm from the bend.

The clevis end of the nylon part can be cut off, drilled carefully at 1mm diameter, and the steel rod cut to the correct length should be glued into the clevis.
Keep the right-angle bend horizontal to the clevis. When dry, paint the rod black and fit as per the kit part. See pictures in the ‘Build 2’ folder.
The outer retaining bracket is then fitted to the clutch rod assembly.
This part may need the upper edge trimming down by 1-2mm to allow the levers to move.
The bracket will need to be clamped in place until the glue dries. Weather to match the engine bay.

The central spindle on the brake/clutch assembly ‘should’ pass through the outer bracket. In reality it does not reach but this makes no difference.
Moving the pedals inside the car should cause the long clutch actuating rod just fitted to move.
NOTE: Do not fit the actuating rod - part 305 – until later on.

The brake master cylinder is made up of four parts and is assembled and painted silver before fitting to the front of the clutch bracket. The hexagonal ‘cap’ on the top will have a hose attached from the fluid reservoir later on.
In reality, there are two brake pipes that come out of the master cylinder and can be added using thin solder wire. In fact though once built, this part of the car is virtually invisible behind the engine so adding the pipes is almost pointless.
More visible brake pipes will be added in other areas later on.
The engine supports previously mentioned should now be fitted.

The front shock absorbers are fitted next.

These assemble easily but make sure the small piston stop – part 230 – has fully dried in place before fitting the piston into the shock absorber body halves – parts 281 & 282.
The kit instructions show a part – 227 – that is labelled ‘Facultative that goes inside the shock absorbers. The English translation in the kit instructions does not mention this part at all.
‘Facultative’ means ‘Optional’.
Use this part to build solid non-working suspension.

Paint the shock absorbers matt black and add dirty brown and oil staining on the pistons before fitting.
Take care when fitting the lower bush of the piston to the pin on the frame. The pin is quite thin and could be easily broken.
You may wish to remove the pin, drill through the lower ‘A’ arm and fit a metal pin instead.
Once the (very) small pins and nuts are fitted they should be weathered down with brown/rust.

STEERING – PAGE 11 KIT INSTRUCTIONS

Section A:
These parts all assemble in a straightforward way.

However, the steering rack - part 69 - is once again a Nylon part. Due to the complex nature of this piece and the fact that it is mostly enclosed when complete, it is best left as-is.
Painting the nylon part is not really possible as the paint will eventually peel and crack.
However, the part can be coloured with a black ‘Sharpie’ fairly successfully.

As you begin to assemble the ‘working’ steering, you will quickly discover that it is very much ‘in theory’. The parts are actually far too easily broken, and also very tightly fitting.
If you are prepared to thin down and open up many parts, some kind of operational steering could probably be made.
Once built, even ‘as-is’, the steering will work sufficiently so that you can position the front wheels by turning them, but almost certainly not by turning the steering wheel.

The ends of the steering arms are in two parts – 493 & 494 - that ‘trap’ a nylon peg – part 66 - in place. In fact, the peg is a very loose fit and will need gluing in with Cyano adhesive. This will not affect the steering operation.

Assembly of the remaining parts is very simple although getting the link arms onto the nylon pegs at the ends of the steering rods will take a bit of pressure and perseverance.
NOTE: The rubber gaiters should fit fully onto the rack leaving the stepped end of the rack tube protruding. This is to allow the mounting bracket – part 213 – to fix to the rack tube ends.
Add foil bands on the steering rack gaiters to represent the hose clips if required.
All of this assembly should be weathered with greys and browns predominantly to represent the dirt and water staining that would occur under the car.

SECTION B

The steering rack is now fitted to the underside of the floor/chassis. Take care when turning the floor/bulkhead over so that the clutch control rod does not drop down and possibly break.
It is advisable to tape the rod to the bulkhead for now.

The kit instructions suggest gluing the two rack mounting plates – parts 410 & 411 – to the underside of the engine bay walls first.
It will be far easier to glue these plates to the steering rack brackets first, and then fix the assembly to the floor. This will prevent inevitable ‘pin and locating hole’ alignment problems when fitting the rack if the kit instructions are followed.
Make sure the plates are fitted to the rack the correct way around – longest end of the plate past the holes, facing backwards and away from the steering arms.

One closing end on the steering rack – part 231 - is confusing in the kit instructions.
It is shown and described as one piece.
It is in fact in two halves, both numbered 231, on two identical sprues – Number 9.
These parts are glued together to make the rack closure part.

The other end of the rack which forms the steering column attachment is assembled easily but not yet fixed in place.
Use a lighter gloss brown around the ends of the steering rack to replicate grease. See pictures for reference.
A small part - 365 – is glued to the inside of the footwell bulkhead.
Make sure this part is fitted with the steering column shaft hole angled upwards into the car interior.

All good fun.....

Roy.


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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby Mark » Sat Apr 04, 2015 6:35 pm

The rust looks very realistic. Superb work :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby number1 » Sat Apr 04, 2015 7:26 pm

Stunning, :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: Worth a "K"
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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby number1 » Sat Apr 04, 2015 7:28 pm

Opps, gave it to Julian by mistake, I owe you one! :oops:
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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby number1 » Sun Apr 05, 2015 11:48 pm

K now given to Roy. ;)
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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby Roymattblack » Wed Apr 08, 2015 4:22 pm

A bit more here for those following.....



SECTION C - Kit instructions page 10

This section gives details on assembling the upper inner ‘deck’ that form the top surfaces of the left, right and rear bulkhead.
Also described is the fitting of several ancillary parts including the battery.

It is highly likely that the rear wall of the bulkhead is warped. It is very important that this panel is absolutely straight so that the upper ‘deck’ panel – part 627 – will fit neatly.
Bracing should be added in the event of any warp. This can be done using metal tube of sufficient strength without being too ‘hefty’. Roughen the surface of the metal and fix with epoxy or a strong Cyano adhesive.

The instructions say that the upper deck – part 627 – should be fitted very early on to the main car.
It would be better to fit other parts to the upper deck first.

Assembly of the upper deck is very straightforward and the kit instructions should be looked at carefully to see how many brackets and fittings can be added before the deck is painted, weathered and finally fitted.
Weathering of this part will be explained in some detail later on as it is an important and very visual part of the engine bay.

To simplify the build:
Glue the bracket – part 298 – to the deck.
Part 305 indicated in the instructions looks like a very short rod with a fitting on one end.
It is in fact a fairly long rod, called out on page 10, section C.
This part is fitted after the upper deck is installed.

Glue part 298 to the deck. You will see that the space marked out on the deck is at right angles to the way the part fits. Ignore this and fit the part as per the kit illustration and also see pictures.
The instructions now suggest fitting a fluid cylinder, coil, various brackets and rods.
Do not do this yet.
Use tape to hold firewall brace - part 335 - against the rear of the upper deck and apply glue underneath.

Two brackets – parts 266 & 334 – should be fitted next.
Make sure you fit the tiny bracket – part 266 – first.
Allow these brackets to dry fully before attempting to fit the actuating lever – part 414 – and the small spring.
Make the spring as previously described, following the measurements in the kit instructions.
Glue the fuse box mounting plate – part 485 – in place.
Glue wiring terminals – parts 395 & 396 – in place.
Glue wiring loom holder – part 394 – in place.
This part will need holding with clamps.
At this point, the upper deck can be painted.


WEATHERING THE UPPER DECK

First, spray the entire assembly either matt or satin black – your choice.
When dry, spray a VERY light dust-coat of dark brown to give a slightly ‘aged’ look.

Very often, these cars were well looked after and although the bodywork was frequently washed and polished, little in the way of cleaning was done under the bonnet (hood.)
The upper deck would rarely get dirty or muddy water on it due to where it is in relation to the wheels.
However, over a period of time dust would certainly settle and this is normally a much lighter shade of brown than dirty water or light rust.
A mist coat of matt sand should be applied next but take care that the upper deck panel does not end up too contrasting to the engine bay inner walls.
To remedy this, a very light mist coat of matt sand should be sprayed around the UPPER area of the engine bay walls.
If the upper deck ends up looking too ‘brown’, tone it down with layers of matt black, comparing each layer to the engine bay and chassis as you go.
It must not look ‘too’ different.

When the upper deck is dry, further weathering can be added.

ALL weathering, dust, dirt, fluids, water – it flows DOWNWARDS.
Do not let your weathering run across any parts.
Always consider gravity.
Keep all your weathering light, as when the shiny bodywork is finally fitted, the contrast will make your weathering look more intense.
Leave the weathering at this point.
More will be added later.

There are five very small decals and one EXTREMELY small decal to apply to the fluid reservoir.
Pay attention to their locations which is called out on pages 5 & 11 of the kit instructions.
At first glance, the diagrams on page 11 make it look as if three decals go on the fluid reservoir, and the other three go on the coil. This is not so. All of the decals go on the fluid reservoir.
Once the decals are in place, secure with a coat of ‘Klear’ and weather with thinned brown when dry.
Fix the reservoir in place with the rubber pipe hanging into the engine bay and attaching to the hexagonal ‘cap’ on the top of the master cylinder. Attach using cyano adhesive


...............................................

Roy.

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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby Roymattblack » Tue Jun 16, 2015 8:53 pm

Just a few recent pics as I'm not even sure anyone visits this forum any more...

Roy.


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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby steve131 » Tue Jun 16, 2015 9:31 pm

Nice work looking good ,have to admit totally missed this build on forum .K awarded. :clap:
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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby alan v » Wed Jun 17, 2015 12:31 am

Watching with interest. :)
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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby casper » Wed Jun 17, 2015 7:08 am

Doing a fantastic job Roy :clap: :clap: :)
Love the engine and all the weathering details even down to the battery terminals :clap: The body and interior look very nice indeed
casp
My Honda MP4/4 Build Diary
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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby number1 » Thu Jun 18, 2015 6:13 pm

Still watching Roy, fantastic weathering, and a beautiful shine on the body :clap: :clap: :clap:
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Re: Roys Citroen Traction

Postby Mark » Fri Jun 19, 2015 12:15 pm

Really enjoying watching what you're doing with this kit. Your attention to detail is amazing :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
Cheers
Mark

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