Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

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Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

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Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Thu Apr 23, 2015 9:43 pm

Hi guys!

Those of you who are model railway enthusiasts will no doubt know about the Warley national model railway show held each year at the NEC Birmingham!
whereas I am a model railway enthusiast, I also have a very soft spot for canals and our waterways heritage! (you only have to look at my profile pic to see evidence of this! ;) ) Anyway, while I was at the Warley show this year I spotted this pair of 'Star' class historic working narrow boats in '0' gauge for model railway scenery. I've decided to build them and display them in their full glory without their pride being taken away hidden in the back of some model scenery with the railway taking the center stage (Like history will tell us is.... well history I suppose! :laughing-rolling: )

Right then! enough of my sappy drivvel! ;)
A bit of history on the boats themselves! These boats are (as I've said before) are a pair of 'Star' class working narrowboats originally designed for the Grand Union Canal Carrying Company Limited (G.U.C.C.Co.Ltd) built roughly 1920-35 these boats were constructed of riveted (first then welded) steel with a composite bottom (steel keel with elm boards) These boats usually came in a Motor and Butty (unpowered) pair to maximize on carrying capacity without using the fuel of two engines! as depicted here.

There were roughly 200 'Star' class narrowboats built, almost all for the G.U.C.C.Co.Ltd but some were bought and sold on. They and similar boats of different classes were a regular sight throughout the early 20th century all over the country hauling everything from milk and chocolate to Coal and diesel fuel both perishable and non perishable goods.

Anyway, now the history lesson is over, it's picture time!! :D So these are the boxes,
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On opening them up, here is what you get, two cast resin waterline hulls including the cabins at the back, 2 packs of cast white metal fittings and 6 white metal duckboards (2 shown here).
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So... the build diary! :dance: And... the first thing I did after reading the instructions is screwed them up, shredded them, squashed them into little bits and chucked them in the wood burner! :laughing-rolling: :laughing-rolling: After which, I took most of the white metal fittings and chucked them straight in the spares box! :lol: All intentional of course! :lol:
The instructions were very poor quality and inaccurate as were the white metal castings so they were hastily got rid of and I'll be scratch building 90% of the finished model! :think: :mrgreen: So really all I paid for was the resin hulls! and even they will be heavily modified! So... I'd best get to work! (Upon writing this I have pretty much finished the models! I've just got to build the diorama! :D )

First thing's first, I'll take the hulls and cut off all that horrible moulded detail and resin flashing! Not only does it look awful but its unlikely the boats would have had rope fenders (those rope bumper things) on the bows in this era and they certainly wouldn't look like that!
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That's better! 8-)
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That's it for the moment! I'll be back soon to show you my butchering skills of the aft cabin on the motor boat! :laughing-rolling:
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Fri Apr 24, 2015 10:43 pm

So.... the butchery begins! :lol: as some people may be able to see from some of my projects, I tend to like interior detail! and if it's not in a kit, I do sometimes like to build my own! take the 2011 Xmas comp for example! where I scratch built a complete tank interior for a 1/72nd tiger tank! ;) So I thought I'd do the same here! but before I show you how I built that, I have to cut out the interior contours from the solid resin cabin.

Here's the cabin as it comes with the kit,
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From a combination of guess work as well as my own knowledge of narrowboat construction, I have drawn a cutting sketch on the underside of the resin cabin, (I've drawn it on both boats but have decided to only build it in the motor boat)
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following this, I then cut off the cabin roof, cut out the doorway section and then set about removing the waste until I had opened out the cabin to the proportions needed for the boatmans cabin and engine room. :D
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Using A fine toothed saw I cut into the resin and took the waste out in chunks. but when it came to cutting out the bulk of the material, I drilled a few large holes in the corners of the block an connected them up with a hacksaw blade. this was very effective to cut nice straight(ish) lines! :? these were then sanded back for a smooth finish.
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This is the result after the bulk material was removed. The back plate was easier to remove first before doing the stern as it was difficult to access that part of the cabin. this was reglued in place later! :shifty:
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And finally with the roof back on, we have a nice hollow cabin ready for fitting out to begin! :dance:
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I'll show the construction of the boatmans cabin and engine room shortly, but first I'll show the steps I took to build the rest of the hull and cargo hold.
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Sat Apr 25, 2015 8:35 pm

Right'o guys... :D

The rest of the hull needed very little modifications. just removing the moulded rope detail and filling in the air holes with filler and rebuilding the rubbing strakes in places and sanding down the bottom for a nice flat smooth face. Nothing too difficult or ambitious! :shock:
So, I've come to the painting! First off, a nice black primer Humbrol No:33 spray. (P.s Sorry about some of the bad photos! :( )
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I then gave the cargo bay and inside (what will become) the engine room a coat of Bauxite red (standard paint colour for these areas on the real boats). The bow and stern wells on both boats also received this colour leaving the bow hatches in black (later painted in Satin black).
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Then the gunnels and step in the stern well deck of the butty received a 'distressing' with a glass fibre pen before being painted in natural wood paint which was then darkened with a black wash to represent weathered wood. (all except the gunnels adjacent to the cabins which were left in steel and in Bauxite red colour)
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Next, the cabin roofs were painted in crimson red (typical colour for most roofs of the G.U.C.C.Co)
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The roof of the motor boat is slightly different to the butty boat in that it is longer because of the engine room and it has a 'pigeon box' on top (Ventilator for the engine which also houses the horn!) The pigeon box had to be hollowed out when I removed the roof when cutting out the cabin space. the outside of this was painted black while the roof was painted in crimson red like the rest of the roof.
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Next up, the chimneys! 8-) two on the motor boat (one for the engine exhaust and the other for the boatmans stove in the cabin) an one for the butty (just for the stove in the cabin.) painted in Satin black with brass straps, placed in position above the engine room and just to the left of the stern cabin hatch.
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At this stage the horn was fitted! (it's basically a 4mm bell designed to go on model ships but shhhh! no one will know the difference! :shhh: :whistle: :lol: ) A small hole was drilled into the pigeon box and the 'horn' was glued in place.
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Now the stern of the motor boat needs a bit of attention. Since these boats were built in the 1930's I want to replicate their original condition! so, I need to make an adjustment to the stern plate! this was originally one whole piece of oak sat on the stern steel hull with the bollards and tiller attached to it so I need to make a packing piece out of plasticard.
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After this was glued in place, the stern piece(s) were painted in Insignia blue (also characteristic of G.U.C.C.Co).
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Now for the cabin paintwork! :dance: (on these models I'm going to leave the cabin doors shut on the butty boat but open on the motor.) The paintwork is the same for both boats so the photos may alternate between them! :shifty:
The stern decoration on canal narrowboats varied considerably! it varied between painters and varied between canal carrying companies! in fact, a well trained eye could tell which painter painted a particular boat, and which company fleet the boat belonged to from a distance purely by the pattern on the stern cabin doors. They varied between quite elaborate artwork to simple designs. I've chosen a really simple design for my boats (mainly because the G.U.C.C.Co tended to favour the simple designs and because I cant be bothered to do very intricate painting! :o :snooty: Yet! :shifty: :snooty: :laughing-rolling: ) Anyway, the back cabin! :lol:
I firstly drew on the pattern,
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then I painted it accordingly! Insignia blue on the top and crimson red underneath! This colour scheme carries on onto the cabin sides with blue on the outside and red on the inside of the panels.
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Caw! that was an awful photo! :o :doh: Some of you eagle-eyed people may have spotted the white border around the engine room doors! well this white border also seperates the other panels too, on the cabin panels this is easily painted as the relief has been pre-moulded onto the model! but for the engine room panel guess what :?: I have to do it myself! :evil: Ah well! this is how I've done it!
First I drew on where the white line would go,
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Then painted roughly over the line,
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I then got some 1mm fine masking tape, placed it over the white paint and painted the other colours over the top! (at this stage I also painted the brass porthole frame as you may notice! or not! :lol: )
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And voila! :D (I also used this method to do the stern cabin doors!)
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The motor boat cabin roof also received the same treatment with a dash of blue making sure the handrail beams stayed red!
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And finally for this edition of the build diary, the characteristic red and white stripes of canal narrowboat sterns! very simply white on the top, red on the bottom, black above the waterline and on the rubbing strakes. (this was tidied up after I took the photo! I assure you! :? :shifty: )
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Thanks for looking in and bearing with me to the end of a very long post! please feel free to post, ask questions etc. (and criticize!) ;)
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Thu May 07, 2015 8:51 pm

Hello again! :D time for another post showing the next stage of construction.... the cargo hold! :mrgreen:

But first, a photo which I missed out from the last post, the red and white stripes of the stern counter section are also featured on the bow.
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Ok! we're up to date again! (sort of! :? )
So then, the cargo hold! first I need to build the rails that will hold the planks supporting the pillars that will hold up the duck boards.
This is made up from some unused strakes from the HMS Hood model, painted light wood brown and glued in place.
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Next I need to modify the supplied pillars to make them look more authentic and to give them my own personal touch! I started with the original castings, (the first one is a little different from the other 2 so I'll cover that separately!) and cut the 'wings' off.
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I marked on where the planks will go (level with the rails running down the hold) and made the plank (which is basically left over Bismarck planking with a slot cut into it.) and glued it on making sure it was level and in line with the rails.
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And tested it in position. (eagle eyed viewers would have spotted the locating holes in the hull earlier! ;) )
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Now for the special first pillar (The mast!) this is chunkier than the other pillars and has the mast attachment on the top to which a 140 foot rope what attached which the horse in the old days used to tow the boat.
So again, I took the casting and cut off the 'wings',
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After filing off the burrs, I filed the corners to make decorative edges and then set to work on the plank which is a little different to the others.
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These planks are wider than the others and are open one end! this is so te mast can be maintained and/or replaced at any time.
because it is wider than the others, I have to make the plank out of two off-cuts of planking. Glued together and marked with the pattern, this was then cut out and hey presto! :D
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After gluing to the mast, here's the finished article!
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Next up are the support ribs for the canvas, these needed very little modification (just re-shaping and adjusting the angle.), just painted black! I had to make a couple of extras as the kit only supplied 3 per boat but I wanted 5 per boat just to make it easier for me! :o :snooty:
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Now for the head and tail boards, I used the head board from the kit but modified it slightly (what a surprise! :mrgreen: 8-) )
Starting with the original casting I cut off the rather sad looking head light mock-up and filed it down.
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Painting it black, I glued it in again having to adjust the angle! (testament to the useless castings!)
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The tail board (for the butty only) was a little easier! just a shaped off-cut of 5mm plasticard. after painting black was glued on to the front of the cabin.
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here's a couple of shots of all the bits tested in position to show the arrangement. (the duck boards in the first photo are the kit castings but are only there for demonstration! they will be thrown away and replacements made!)
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I've also made support beams for the head boards (and tail board for the butty) to help when I come to do the canvasing.
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Once I was happy with the arrangement I then painted the pillars and masts in the red, white and blue of the livery with below the hold planks in Bauxite red and the planks in crimson red.
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Finally, before starting the canvas I'll attach the 'horse' traveler to the front of the engine room on the motor boat (the butty would have had one too but I'll be covering that up with the canvas). This is simply 1mm wire painted black and glued on! But first I need to make the holes.
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But before I attach the traveler I need to make the steel ring to which the center line will be attached. (simply a brass ring used for rigging painted black.)
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Photos showing the traveler glued in followed by the ring.
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Okey doke! I'll leave this update for now! (I've probably bored you enough by now... :oops: ) Next up I'll tackle the canvas! I'll be doing it slightly different on the motor than that on the butty but I'll give more details next time. :D

Hope you're enjoying reading this build diary as much as I am building it! :) please feel free to comment and suggest/criticize (constructively though right!?... :shifty: )
So... who's brave enough to start the ball rolling with the first comment? :lol: :angelic-sunshine:
Stay tuned for the next installment! :D
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby steve131 » Thu May 07, 2015 9:45 pm

Great work Tom they look like they would be right at home at the Black Country Living Museum. K awarded :clap: :clap:
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Thu May 07, 2015 9:55 pm

Thanks Steve! :) it just so happens that the motor boat in the condition that I'm modelling it in is actually based on 'Jupiter' one of the preserved 'star' class narrow boats which was at the black country living museums historic boat rally last year when I went! :)
Thanks for the K! I have to say that they do look rather good now that I've finished them! (I'm catching up slowly with the build diary!) I'm currently working on a little diorama for it which I hope will enhance the models! :)

Stay tuned! :D
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby steve131 » Thu May 07, 2015 10:55 pm

Hello Tom have you ever tried legging the Dudley tunnel :?: Did it in the 80s with theCubs good fun. 8-)
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Fri May 08, 2015 7:13 am

Hiya mate! No I haven't. It's something I have wanted to do!
But I have legged through the very low and narrow M5 pass on the Droitwich canal when we got stuck at high flood levels! :laughing-rolling:
Last edited by tom1992 on Sun May 10, 2015 8:41 am, edited 1 time in total.
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby steve131 » Fri May 08, 2015 8:24 am

Hello Tom the Black Country Living Museum do a Santa hunt, my girls loved it, now your a Father you can go and combine the Dudley tunnel result ;) Also got Severn Valley Railway Santa Special and West Midlands Safari Park Santa safari next to it, you do the good stuff and it keeps SWMBO happy :lol:
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Fri May 08, 2015 8:32 am

Can't argue with that! :D :lol:
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Sun May 10, 2015 10:11 am

Ok everybody, time for the canvas.

As mentioned last time, I'm going to sheet up the motor boat slightly differently to the butty. On the butty I'm going to stretch out the full canvas over the entire length of the cargo hold but on the motor I'm going to do full canvas over half the hold and just the lower canvas sheets for the rest of the hold leaving a small section open and rolled back to allow access to the center line.

But first, the duck boards need to be installed and we need some cargo! :mrgreen:
So, the duck boards! again, these were made from sections of spare Bismarck planking, cut into lengths fitting the spacing between the pillars with scarf joints cut into them.
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After being painted crimson red like the others these were glued on to the butty but left off the motor until I have 'loaded' the cargo 8-)
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Ok, now for the cargo! These boats would have carried anything from milk to grain and oil and everything in between! I've gone for the fairly traditional coal load. There are many ways that you can mimic and give the impression of miniature coal and all of these ways have pro's and con's for them, but for me, nothing can look as good as the real thing! so I'm going to load real coal into my boats because it looks the most.... um.... 'realistic'! :shock: :laughing-rolling:

I've got a little pot of mixed sized mini coal chunks which I've made by wrapping large(er) coal chunks in an old rag and smashing them with a mallet! :D a man of precision me! :laughing-rolling: No half measures! :lol:
I just tipped the coal into the hold about two thirds the way along making sure that the coal is mounded up nearer the middle of the hold and below the gunnels at the stern end to give the impression that some coal has already been delivered and the boats are on their way to the next delivery.
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After I was happy with the arrangement, I glued the coal in place using a slightly diluted PVA/water mix with a drop of washing up liquid to break the tension, applied with a pipette.
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Now that I've got the coal stuck in I can make the center line on the motor boat without it being covered in coal. I've made this with .8 mm twine.
First I've tied it to the ring,
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Then, using a pair of needle nosed pliers I've wound the twine round the prongs (leaving a bit of slack) and then glued it with super glue on the top and bottom (taking care not to glue it to the pliers) :superlglue: which has left it in a nice neat coil.
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I've then cut off a section of the roof I separated and painted earlier and glued it to the cabin and then glued the coil onto the top. (once the duck boards were in place!)
(photo appears later)

Now I can attach the duck boards onto the tops of the pillars. Unlike the butty boards which end in a tail board, the motor boats duck boards are fastened directly to the roof of the higher engine room/cabin on the motor boat. (all photos are of the motor boat. The butty was easy cos I haven't had to paint the bits or make better ones as they will not be seen!)
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And so finally to the canvas! I've stretched canvas over many things from model planes with fabric skin to railway box van roofs etc. and I've found nothing better to resemble stretched canvas than good old bog standard.... ummm... bog roll! :laughing-rolling: ;) Yes! BOG ROLL!! :lol:
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I'll start with the butty canvas as It's easier to start with, I've taken the roll and using a knife have taken off the perforated edge to be left with a nice clean edge and glued it to the piece of wood on the tail board making sure that the lower edge marries up with the gunnels. (I used liquid superglue throughout as it spreads along the roll easily and sets hard and fast. so perfect for the puropse! :superlglue: )
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I then stretched it as far as it will go (without breaking, darn perforations!! :angry-banghead: ) and then glued it to the bits of wood on the head board. (leaving a little off the end to fold round to the front.)
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And then glued along the other supports constantly keeping the roll taught, in line with the gunnels and NOT gluing it to my fingers!!! :angry-cussingblack: :superlglue:
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And then folded the roll over and did the same the other side. (the second side is far more difficult as you don't have as much roll to use to keep it taught!) I've also folded it round the front and glued it down making sure there aren't any air bubbles or creases... easier said than done! :doh:
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And Voila!! :D stretched canvas!
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Finally all I needed to do was to paint it black, drill out the holes down the gunnels 27 down each side spaced 15mm apart and glued in brass eyelets (also black) to which the lashings will be tied to.
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Thanks for looking!
Next time I will be painting on the company name, tying down the lashings and showing you what I did with the motor boat! :D
Stay tuned!
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby steve131 » Sun May 10, 2015 11:08 am

Do you dope the rest of the T roll to stop it tearing, always nice to see old spare parts of kits being recycled that's why i got a big spares box. :clap:
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Sun May 10, 2015 8:10 pm

Hi Steve,
No I don't bother. It stretches enough without tearing to get taught enough to make a good effect and be easy enough to work with without doping it. The black paint helps strengthen the paper once it is glued down which incidentally helps strengthen it too when the superglue spreads through it.
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Sun May 10, 2015 9:21 pm

Hello everybody!

Right, on with the painting! With most canal carrying companies throughout the eras it was customary to paint the companies name on both the boat cabin sides and on the canvas top sheets. In the case of the G.U.C.C.Co they either painted on their full name along the canvas sides, or, what was more common they simply painted on their 'initials' I.e 'G.U.C.C.Co.Ltd' in a semicircular shape with the Ltd in the center. So this is what I hope to replicate.

I started with cutting out a strip of masking tape and cutting it to size to fit on the canvas,
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I then drew on the design and cut it out using a very sharp scalpel! (yes it has been used before!)
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Then, after sticking it onto the canvas, I painted over it with white paint making sure the paint didn't seep under the tape. (as much as possible! this is toilet paper after all! :oops: )
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After taking off the masking tape and tidying it up a little bit with black paint, I'm left with this, :D Pretty good me thinks! ;)
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The company name was usually painted in three places along the canvas top sheets front, middle and back (how surprising!) and usually the full company name was painted on the cabin sides along with the boat name (sometimes on the bow or stern wales) and the place of registration/berth and a contact address or number. These will be covered later.

But now I've got the name printed on. I can make a start on the lashings! :D
Now boatmen were known for their decorative rope work! this was anything from the coils of rope (known as 'cheesing') to the decorative fenders and tassels etc. In line with this, it was usual that the first 3 or so lashings were permanently umm... lashed with decorative knots and coils etc. This not only looked nice but saved hassle when unloading the boats in the wind having the canvas blowing off into the water! :angry-banghead: :doh:
So, again I'm going to replicate this with a coil of .8mm white plaited thread.

First, I made a small coil on a sheet of plastic by putting a spot of superglue down and winding the thread round it,
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Then I looped the other end through the first eyelet, (Ok, It's a different photo of a different stage but I'ts the same principle! :roll: )
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I passed the thread through the other eyelet over the top of the canvas and repeated it twice before gluing the coil to the left side, making another coil and gluing that to the right side. And... after all that, I'm left with this! :dance:
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And after doing it twice more and a fourth one at an angle across the head board, it looks like this. :D 8-)
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Pretty cool eh? :D Now for the 'normal' lashings or the 'working' lashings these were simple to allow for quick tying and untying and could be undone/done by a single boatman from either side of the boat. The knot would have been a boatmans hitch but this was very difficult to do in miniature! (believe me I tried! :x :cry: ) so I've just done a simple fastening but still looks ok and effective! ;)

So again, I've started by threading the thread through the first eyelet (btw, this is the .8mm twine used previously for the center line),
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Going over the top of the canvas, this was then threaded through the opposite eyelet (flat against the canvas),
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After making a loop with the thread, it was then threaded back through the eyelet and is left until later,
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Next, the other end is taken through the loop that has just been created and is threaded back through the eyelet,
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After being pulled taught, this is the look of the knot from above.
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Finally the thread can be knotted, (I put a dab of superglue on the eyelets just to hold the thread taught while you tie the knots!)
Simply looped round the back of the lashing and back through the loop, pulled taught and trimmed back to about 2-3mm and a dab of superglue to secure! (repeated on the other side.) :D
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And Voila! :mrgreen: repeated all down the canvas and it looks very good I must admit! ;)
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Meh! I'm tired now! I'll show you the motor boats canvas in the next posting but I hope I've whetted your appetites! ;) :lol:
Please feel free to make any comments, ask any questions and the such like! Thanks for looking and I'll catch up with you another day. 8-)
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Mon May 11, 2015 8:47 pm

Howdy do! :mrgreen: This time I'm definitely going to cover the motor boats canvas sheets.

As mentioned before, I'm going to do the bow half of the cargo hold with the full canvas as on the butty but with the aft half at half canvas showing off the cargo of coal! (I'e the canvas under sheeting).

So first I need to make the under sheets. Once again I've used bog roll, cut to 20mm wide and 20mm longer than half the length of the hold. I've also cut out of 5mm thick plasticard little squares 3mm/sq which I've glued along the top edge at 20mm intervals and in the bottom corner of one side. (this will form the roll of canvas later) and drilled a .9mm hole in the squares along the top edge only.
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After a coat of black paint inside and out, they're ready to install.
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Unfortunately, I don't have any photos of me installing them! :cry: :doh: However I will tell you how I did it... basically very similar to the other way! just wrapped and glued the 20mm excess around one of the support 'V' brackets and the other end on the one side onto the strip of wood used in the butty canvas. the other side (where I attached the two plastic squares) I rolled back using a pair of needle-nosed pliers a few times until I got a nice canvas roll.

Now when the canvas top sheets were removed, they were rolled up, lashed and stored along the gunnels, so I will try and replicate this now.
I took the good old bog roll again, measured it to a length about 20mm short of the length of the canvas bottom sheets (incidentally, this length should be just short of the eyelet just before the end of the bottom sheets) and about 40mm wide. Which I rolled into a neat sausage (about 2-3mm) diameter and glued with superglue (again without gluing my fingers in the process! :angry-banghead: :superlglue: )
[img]http://i1300.photobucket.com/albums/ag99/tombonewell/SAM_3514_zpskhwcawjx.jpg[/img
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I then cut off the ends for neatness sakes :roll: :lol: and painted them black.
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I then got the .8mm twine again and wrapped it round the rolls a few times at 20mm intervals (just like the main lashings) starting 20mm in from one end (the end that will butt up against the eyelet) all the way along the until the end (which should be long enough to allow the last one to be about 3-5mm from the end.) For less faff I went the whole way along the roll with one length of twine without cutting it! :whistle:
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...(after cutting)... This is what it should look like, (excuse the poor camera skills! the cameraman was shot shortly after taking these photos! :laughing-rolling: )
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These were then glued on to the gunnels at the base of the lower canvas sheets, (with hindsight (and how wonderful hindsight is!! :doh: :angry-banghead: ) I should havve put on the top canvas sheets over the bow section of the hold before attaching these canvas rolls as they overlap them by 20mm! oh well! :roll: )
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I then lashed the lower sheets to the duck boards. Knotted exactly the same way as the top sheet lashings but only over the top once and then tied to the other side. (again, there was a specific quick tie/untie knot used for this professionally but this is very difficult to model in fine scale! :evil: ) So a very simple knot it is.
This photo shows the top view of the lashings but also how it was glued o the front support bracket.
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This photo shows all the lashings... umm.. lashed! and the spacing I've got between the rolls and the end of the canvas. (slightly more than I've said but that's due to where I've placed my pillars.)
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This last photo shows both the last lashing which is slightly different from the others as it's only one sided because of the rolled open section for the center line (which can also be seen on the right).
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Finally, the top sheets go on in the same way as the butty boat (with hindsight of course this should have gone on after the lower sheets! :angry-banghead: ), painted with the company initials and lashed in the same way. (the initials in the center are cut in half as that is where I've chosen to have the canvas split.)
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And this is the result! :D
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Right that's enough photos for one post! I'll leave it there and be back with another post ASAP! :)
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
tom1992
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Tue May 12, 2015 8:19 pm

Hello again! :D In this section I will be focusing on bits and bobs, fixtures/fittings and this and that! Some of these things you will have seen in some of the other photos as I've installed them at different stages but i thought I'd talk about them all in one place for neatness sake and simplicity! ;) :lol:

So first up (and in no particular order), The large rudder or 'Ellum' on the stern of the butty boat (including the tiller).
Again, starting with the original casting, I've removed all the horrible flashing and moulded details and tidied it up a little, The tiller received a similar treatment!
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Next, the Ellum received a nice new coat of paint in colours funnily enough look very similar to the rest of the boat!! :think: :laughing-rolling: The little black knob on the other side of the Ellum stock is a blob of superglue gel painted black which will become the dirty great bolt that holds the tiller on. After painting the Ellum was then glued onto the butty sternpost.
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The little rope button fender that you can see on the end was made from a length of .5mm steel piano wire bent into a shape like thus,
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I then got that good old .8mm twine that is becoming famous in this build diary so far :lol: and wrapped it round until it looked something like this, (it kinda looks like a funny coliored candyfloss!! :lol: )
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After removing the shaft, it looks like this! It was ten glued to the end of the Ellum and Voila! :D
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Next up, the tiller also had a paint job again same colours but in a different pattern and glued to the Ellum stock (making sure it's in line with the black blob/'bolt') The tiller arm had to be shortened as it was far too long! the boatmen would have been able to hang their washing off it inside the cabin! :lol: After shortening, it now fits into the hands of my little butty steerer (covered later in this section).
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I then added the decorative ropework using the same braided white thread as used earlier. And that completes the Ellum! :dance: The motor boats rudder is considerably smaller and won't be seen above water except the little loop on the end but that'll be added later.
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And now for something completely different..... A mop!! :laughing-rolling: :laughing-rolling: No really!.... A mop! ;) one of two mops that would have been stored on the cabin roofs. The castings looked horrible so I had to replace the mop head for my own version! see what you think...

First, the casting Yuck! :puke-front: So I removed the mop head at the base,
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I then got some string, unraveled it a little bit and placed a blob of glue in the center.
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I then cut a bit off at the glue mark and after tidying it up a bit, I glued it to the suitably painted shaft. Voila!! :D The other one was made in exactly the same way and they will be attached to the cabin roof later.
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Okey dokey. and now for some water cans! (Called Buckby cans) :) (no joke this time ;) ) I haven't modified these in any way as there was no need to. All they needed was a nice paint job! These were often painted very elaborately but I cant be bothered so I did a simpler design! I decided to paint the ones on the Butty differently as each boat had uniquely painted canalware. They were then glued to the roof and the mop handle was inserted through the handles of the Buckby cans.
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Pretty cool eh? :D
Also featured on the roof of the cabins was a boat hook. used for pulling out weeds etc unhooking lines and closing lock gates (and any other use a boatman could find for it! ;) ). Same as the Buckby cans, all they needed was a coat of paint and sticking down. :handgestures-thumbup:
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Hmmm... what next?? :think: I know... the doors! :banana-dance:
Again, no need to alter the castings bar a clean up, they just need a paint job and a bit of colour adding,
So starting with a yellow ocher surround, then crimson red was added round the raised bits and in the recessed bits,
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Most of the doors will be glued with their backs up against the cabin sides so there is no need to paint the other side, but two sets of doors will be in the closed position, (the rear butty cabin doors and the starboard engine room doors on the motor boat) So they need to be painted to match the design on the cabin sides in those locations,
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After the doors were painted in the base colours, they needed the final details adding! Usually, the doors were painted with elaborate paintings of roses and castles which some of you may have heard of! this is rather difficult to paint in such a small scale so I've chosen to 'cheat' and buy a decal transfer sheet for canal boats!
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Half of these transfers i wont use as I'll be doing it myself (ant they look pretty terrible anyway!) but in this stage I will be using the transfers for the doors, so I cut them out!,
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As I've already painted the doors in a better (more realistic colour), there is no need for the whole transfer! so I cut out just the roses and castles bits and placed them in water as is the usual way and applied them to the doors! :D
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Finally, the doors need to be glued in their various locations and we're done! :dance:
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Right... I'll leave it there for now! I will be back for more bits and bobs etc. later on! :handgestures-salute: but for now.... :greetings-cya:
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby steve131 » Wed May 13, 2015 7:49 am

Are you going to give the paint a gloss varnish
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Wed May 13, 2015 11:07 am

No, mate. Not gloss anyway! I may try Satin varnish though... :think: but honestly it doesn't look too bad from the distance I'll be looking at it. So I may leave it altogether! I'll see.
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby steve131 » Wed May 13, 2015 2:35 pm

Hello Tom it was probably just me sitting by a pub canal side in various degrees of drunkenness how shiny and decorated the cabins were that's why i wondered about gloss,on reflection your doing a working boat not pleasure one.Keep up good work :clap: 8-)
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby Mark » Wed May 13, 2015 5:28 pm

Your attention to detail is amazing. Love the loo paper canvas. That trick works really well.
Cheers
Mark

If you nose runs and your feet smell, you're upside down !
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