Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Wed May 13, 2015 9:34 pm

Hi Steve, you are correct, working boats very rarely had more than a few things painted in a gloss finish! typically the company name on the cabin, any advertisements on the cratch headboard and the chimneys! but these rarely stayed clean for very long! in fact the state of these is immaculate considering! ...having said that, they are too clean! I may well weather the boats before I finally place them in the diorama. :think: :think:
Thanks for the applause! ;)

Thanks Mark! yes I do like the bog roll technique, As I've said, I've used it many a time on railway wagon and coach roofs but this is the first time I've used it on a boat canvas but yes! it's worked out well! :D
Yeah, I think the reason why i can add so much nice detail is because I know the prototypes of these boats so well and have a special interest in them (and because lots of the original boats this is based on still exist! unlike some of the models of ships that have sunk over 100 years ago for instance! :lol: ) So it is nice to see a highly detailed modle of my own can emerge from what was a pretty shocking kit! :shock: :mrgreen:

Thanks for the comments guys!
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Thu May 14, 2015 8:21 pm

Hi guys, time for more photos of fixtures and fittings and general stuff... :P

First, probably something I should have put on the last post about the doors but oh well!... It was traditional and usual that the names of motor boats were painted on the engine room doors which left space for the company name to go on the cabin sides! So naturally, I've done the same thing! now as the port side engine room doors will be in the open position, there is no need to paint the name on that side as the open doors will obscure the panel where the name will go! but I will use it for an example.

First, I got the masking tape again! And just like the company initials on the canvas, I cut into it the boats name, (In this case, 'COMET' in keeping with the tradition that the names of craft in a particular class resembled what the class name portrayed! e.g craft of the 'Town' class were named: Gloucester, Brighton, Bristol, Norwich ect.)
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After I stuck the name to the cabin side (I know it's the open side but it's just to show how the name runs over the doors! :shifty: ),
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I painted on the name in white paint, tidied it up a bit, and painted on the black shadowing, It looked rather like this! :| :mrgreen:
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Whilst on the motor boats the name was almost always on the engine room doors, on the butty boats they were often painted on either the bow or the stern gunnels! However they were more often than not on the stern gunnels so again that is where I've chosen to paint mine. Due to the sale and size this painting has to be, I'm unable to do the shadowing and make it look really nice! :cry: so instead I've had to just paint it simply and FREEHAND!! :evil: :o (It wasn't too bad though considering! :oops: ) but it ended up looking like this, :think: It'll do...
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I've also added the company name and details to the stern cabins as I've mentioned it so much! I tried using some home printed transfer paper but this failed miserably :evil: and after a strongly worded letter to the company that produced it (with not much success I must add... :x :snooty: ), I decided to do things much more simply and print the design out on card and glue it on! :handgestures-thumbupright: (I couldn't freehand paint it on as the letters and numbers were even smaller than that of the butty name! it would have been suicidal for me to try and paint that small! :( Still... At least it looks nice! :D )
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As you may have seen from previous photos, I've also painted a little number in the middle of the little back panel on both boats (different numbers) It was common for companies with fleets of boats (large and small) or boatbuilders to mark their boats with a fleet number, or a number corresponding to the order they were built on the assembly line! I.e number '#' 1 was build first then #2, then #3 and so on! I've just chosen two random numbers for mine. It was common that a motor was built and then a butty was built to accompany it (in the days of motor boats) if it was ordered by the customer but boat pairs were often reshuffled or boats were built out of order so the numbers on the boats didn't necessarily match up. (unfortunately I don't have a photo of this stage! :( sorry.)

Finally for this little post, I'll whack up a photo or two of the painted figures that you'll no doubt have seen in many of the photos! Both hand painted of course! :) I had to move/break their arms and posture a little bit to get them into the right poses as they were originally farm labourers! one holding a broom and the other forking hay bails.
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I'll leave it there until next time, just a few more little bits and bobs and then I'll get to my favourite bit! :D
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby steve131 » Thu May 14, 2015 8:46 pm

Great work on the Bargee are they Harry H Corbett and Ronnie Barker ;)
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Thu May 14, 2015 8:49 pm

Ha ha ha! :lol: I like it! ;) from henceforth they shall be known as Harry and Ronnie! :clap: Which one is which? :think: :think:
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby steve131 » Thu May 14, 2015 8:58 pm

Hemel is wearing the tie always the Don Juan, have you got a copy of the film :?:
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Thu May 14, 2015 9:47 pm

No I'm afraid not! :( must get hold of one someday! :think:
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby steve131 » Thu May 14, 2015 9:53 pm

Ellie can get you one from Amazon for Fathers day next month. 8-)
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Thu May 14, 2015 10:19 pm

Ha ha ha!! :lol: Nice one Steve! :clap: something tells me that that's not going to happen! ;)
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby steve131 » Thu May 14, 2015 10:29 pm

My children never get my hints :violin: Sometimes they are good, see if Fury turns up next month. :think:
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Tue May 19, 2015 9:15 pm

Hello everyone! Sorry about the delay between posts but I've had a few unexpected things come up! (not model related!)

So Anyway, on with the bits and bobs and then I'll show you my favourite bit! which I'm sure you're all dying to fine out what it could possibly be! :D ;) (In actual fact I now tell a lie! :o This 'favourite bit' has now been superseded by another favourite bit! 8-) )

Right, next up I'll deal with all the rope work. To make the coils of rope (Known as 'Cheesing') I take the good old .8mm twine which is becoming a veteran to this build diary! and with a blob of superglue, stick it to a scrap piece of plastic.
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Then, by wrapping it round the blob of superglue (gluing as you go), you will build up a coil which will eventually look like this!
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Now to make the loop at the end, I took the loose end and folded it back on itself and glued it together leaving a little loop in the middle just big enough to fit over the 'T'bar. (sorry about the photo! :oops: )
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I then got some thinner twine (.5mm) and glued the end to the base of the loop,
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By wrapping it round and round the 'splice' and gluing as you go, you'll end up with what looks like a hangmans noose! :?
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Voila! :D the same technique was used for the connection of the center line to the ring traveler on the motor. This 'Cheese' was then glued onto the bow of the motor, (The butty used to only have a center line and a stern line so didn't have a 'cheese' on the bow I'll explain why in a bit.)
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Ok then, In the days before motor boats, all narrow boats would have been towed by a horse using a long line or 'hauling line' this was commonly more than 100ft long (roughly 1 1/2 times the length of a boat) this would allow the horse to pull the boat a fair distance in front of the boat thus at a lesser angle avoiding pulling the boat into the bank as much as if it was say 50ft in front. Now that a motor boat can tow the butty, there is no need for the horse as it can be towed over the long pounds (stretches of waterway between locks) However, the motor boat cannot tow up or down lock flights! so going up and down locks, the boat (all up to 80 tonnes of it) had to be pulled by hand into and out of a single lock and between locks in short pounds on a lock flight! A hard job!! trust me I've done it!! The hauling line was stored like the bow line, on the bow deck so the driver of the motor boat could grab it easily. I'll explain the procedure to approaching a lock to help you understand why...
On the approach to a lock with the motor boat towing the butty on 'cross-straps' (Explained later) The motor boat driver would slow down, detach from the butty by throwing off the cross-straps from his bollards and quickly grabs the hauling line coil and launches it onto the towpath. The butty steerer will then steer towards the bank, take his stern line, attach it to his stern 'T' stud and jump off onto the towpath. He will then grab the hauling line (which by now will not be too far away due to to the momentum of the boat) and using both lines will pull the boat into the bank and slow it to a stop! (which is hard work considering that you are pulling 80 tonnes of boat travelling at 2-3mph which doesn't sound a lot but that's a lot of momentum!). The motor boat will then work it's way down the lock, and the butty will follow afterwards being hauled into the lock by the butty steerer.
Right, Now we have that lesson on how professional boatmen operate! :lol: I'll show you how the hauling line is placed on the boat.

First, the .8mm twine is attached to the butty mast in a similar way to that of the traveler ring on the motor boat.
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It then hangs loose down the sides of the canvas and rests on the bow hatch within reach of the 'beak', (the only difference between that and the motor boats bow line is the fact that the hauling line has a bigger coil!)
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Using the same method, the Butty's stern line is made and glued on the cabin roof,
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Now the stern line of the Motor boat I've modeled differently! As this line was required quickly in an emergency and used in locks far more than that of the butty It was usually coiled so that both ends were immediately available to the hands of the motor boat driver. So how I modeled it had to be altered slightly! I stared by making the loop in exactly the same way as described earlier, but this time instead of starting the coil at the 'free end' and working outwards, I started at the loop end (leaving a short amount of free line) and made the largest extent of the coil and worked inwards,
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Once i'd reached the middle, I took the line out from the center and again leaving a bit of free line took it over the coil and after wrapping some .5mm twine to simulate end splicing I glued it down in a similar direction to where the loop end of the line came in.
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It was then glued onto the cabin roof so that both ends ended up within reach of the motor boat driver. :mrgreen:
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Ok, we've seen one rope fender, Now I'll show you the others! Made using the same technique as the little button fender, they started with a wire frame and then wrapped round with the .8mm twine. shaped and glued together, they formed an assembly that fits on the stern counter to protect the thin rudder from being hit by the butty during towing. (when the butty was attached using cross-straps, the button fender was hauled out of the way and onto the top of the other to get the pair closer to reduce drag so this was removed after shooting these photos and will be replaced when they are finally glued in place.)
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Here you can also see the two black bollards on the stern of the Motor boat used for mooring up, 'breasting up' (both boats tied side by side), and towing the butty. (Just saves me posting this later! ;) )
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To complete the fenders and for authenticity, I took some 1mm chain and cut it to lengths and glued one end to the stern counter and the other to either end of the fender(s),
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Next up are the cross-straps, There were three different ways that a motor boat would and could tow a butty, the first was by using 'cross-straps' thick lengths of rope with a loop at either end. One end was attached to the motors bollard, it then crossed over the other strap (attached to the bollard on the other side) and round the 'beak' before attaching to the butt's bow 'T'stud with the other loop (along with the other strap), the second way was called a 'snatcher' a short length of line at about 20ft (often the stern line which avoided having an extra length of rope lying around!) the loop attached to the Butty's 'T' stud while the loose end was tied round either bollard on the motors stern. The third and final way of towing the butty was the long line or 'Snubber' (commonly called 'long lining') This was done using the hauling line on the butty and tying it to one of the bollards of the motor boat on a short line to start with, it was then extended slowly until it was at full length (or however long the motor driver decided) usually, due to the bends and obstacles of the canals, the full length of a long line could only really be used on a river or a long straight stretch of canal.

Due to the size restrictions of my finished diorama space (and because it looks the nicest and was the most common way of towing on the canal system), I've decided to model the butty being towed by the cross-straps! :D

For this, I took three lengths of .8mm twine and spun them in the traditional rope making method to form a thick rope. I then formed a loop at either end (small enough to fit round the bollards and 'T'stud but large enough to look reasonable) and glued them to the bollards. I'll attach them to the butty after the boats are glued to the diorama. You can see that I've removed the top of the 'T'stud as it'll be easier to glue the loops to the shaft and then glue the top on rather than faff with trying to loop them over the top! :evil:
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And finally for the rope work and this post, The straps down the side of the butty cabin that the straps used for 'Breasting up' are tied to.
Firstly I drilled a 1mm hole in the handrail above, then I got the braided white thread used before and tied it round the hole and spliced the end, (duplicated on one side and repeated on the other.)
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The rope used for 'Breasting up' was usually stored on the side of the butty that it'll be used next (if known) and so one side will just have the white straps.
the coil was made in the same way as the coil for the center line on the motor boat. This was then glued to the side of the cabin on top of one of the white straps while the other was used to tie on the rope. The free end of the rope was them tied round the shackle that would have been welded to the gunnels.
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And that's it! sorry for some of the waffling on! :oops: :laughing-rolling: Hope you'll forgive me! :? Please leave your comments etc. and keep criticisms constructive! :pray: :D
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby steve131 » Wed May 20, 2015 6:04 pm

Great work Tom :clap:
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Wed May 20, 2015 9:33 pm

Thanks Steve! :-) your comments are always greatly appreciated! :text-thankyoublue:
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby Mark » Wed May 20, 2015 10:33 pm

Have to agree, look brilliant. Love your attention to detail :clap: :clap: :clap:
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Thu May 21, 2015 6:42 pm

Cheers Mark! :-) haven't got to the best bit yet! ;) :D
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Sat May 23, 2015 12:39 pm

Hi guys! Time for another update. :D
Hopefully I'll finish off the bits and bobs now, brace yourself!

First off is the headlamps, the shaft is made from a spare shaft used to link the tracks on the Tiger tank model (Steve will be pleased to know! ;) ) Cut in half and tidied up a bit.
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The lamp hood is made from an off cut of 3mm plasticard, cut to 8mm/sq squares and shaped to 8mm diameter circles.
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Then, using a 8mm drill bit and a tool used for countersinking countersink screws :lol: I turned them into 8mm bowls. (using a knife I sculpted the underside to the same shape.) I then drilled a 1mm hole in the bottom.
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The shafts were then glued to the hoods using superglue in line with that hole.
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Time for a spot of paint! the shafts and back of the hoods got a coat of black paint while the inside of the hood was painted in silver to reflect the light. I then added a small jewel (No not a diamond!! :laughing-rolling: ) normally used for car headlights and the such like. And Voila! :D
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They were then glued in position on the bow deck (they are in fact leaning up against the decorative rope work which is very naughty! :lol: :oops: ) And were done! :dance:
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Next, all the hatches were the castings supplied with the kit, they had a coat of white paint and the transfer from the transfer sheet added to them and then glued in place. Simples! *Squeek* :lol: The black bands were just printed on the transfer so I thought I'd improve them by gluing on what is supposed to be hinges for a rudder on a ship! but opened out they make great bands. :D These were then glued in place, one on the cabin of each boat and two narrower ones on the engine room of the motor boat! one was left shut but the other I glued in the open position showing off the engine room. (which I'll come to in a bit! You may have already guessed what my 'old favourite' bit is! ;) )
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Next, I've made the number plates for the motor boat (similar to the number plates of todays cars, they were necessary to identify boats to authorities etc.) Simple enough to make! just a 1mm piece of plasticard, cut to shape and size. Painted white with a black border with the number painted in the middle! :handgestures-thumbupleft:
(brownie points and a 'K' for the first person to recognize the number! 8-) )
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Next, A very important feature of any movable floating vessel... the tiller. :lol:
Again, just the original casting but slightly modified. It was bent to a different shape as it was far too tall! and then painted in funny colours! :roll: red, white and blue of course! with the tiller handle painted a brass/bronze colour and the tip in a dark oak.
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I then added a brass belaying pin (supposed to be on a sailing ship) to the tiller base after it was painted black to add a nice feature! without it it just looks dull! ;)
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The tiller was then glued in place and our steerer was posted to his job! :lol:
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Last of all the bits but certainly not the least is the two shackles on either side of the motor and butty cabin gunnels. Used to tie up and 'breast up' with the motor and in locks. Made from some .5mm piano wire curled with round nosed pliers and a length of wire through the middle. Painted black and glued in position.
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Just gonna get myself some lunch and then I'll be back and start on the interior detail! :D
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Sat May 23, 2015 1:47 pm

Ok so onto the interior detail! :D I'll be scratch building the engine room, the engine and the boatmans cabin! :? :shock: So first I have to prepare the base.
Made out of 1mm plasticard in a box shape with a central partition. (well, not quite central! ;) )
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The whole thing was ten given a spray of black primer and the engine room was coated in bauxite red.
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Because the engine prop shaft went underneath the floor of the boatmans cabin giving it that squashed look, I had to raise the floor of the boatmans cabin. Simple enough, I just cut out the shape of the cabin out of 3mm plasticard and built it up until it came to the right level,
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The floors were then clad with some bamboo planking left over from the 'Sovereign of the seas' partwork and given a black wash to improve depth and to weather it slightly,
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The cabin sides of the boatmans cabin then received the same treatment (but without the wash). And then the floor was glued in place
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I then made the steps (also out of 1mm plasticard) cut and glued to shape. The little notch on the back is so it can slip under the lip of the back head thus touching the back of the hull.
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I've painted the steps to try and simulate the 'scumbling' effect used by boatmen starting with a dark(ish) brown undercoat, then yellow ocher top coat and then 'drew on' by a scriber/probe/paint brush to form the effect. (it was the best I can do in this scale! :cry: ) The steps were then glued in place.
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I then made and glued the side bits in place (these show the extent of the cabin, this is where the 'swims' (where the water goes from outside the contours of the boat into the propeller in a shallow angle the longer the swim the better the boat handled typically a working narrowboat would have had 10-12ft swims) cut into the cabin space). As these won't be seen once in place and are merely for support, I don't know why I've painted them! :doh: :lol:
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Hmmm... :think: I don't know how but I seem to have lost all the photos of the next stages! :angry-banghead: :evil: but anyway, here's a couple of shots of the finished result, I've made a wardrobe, and the bed with two drawers in it. The pillow and mattress/quilt is made out of polystyrene cut to shape/shaped and painted. The rest is plasticard also painted. I've painted on some white/coulored representatives of boatmans wife's doilies for a bit of colour! ;)
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Right, I'll have to leave it there, my damsel is in distress! :laughing-rolling: Tune in next time! :angelic-sunshine:
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby Mark » Sat May 23, 2015 2:17 pm

4472 ? The Flying Scotsman ?

Like I said before, love the attention to detail :clap: :clap: :clap:
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby tom1992 » Sat May 23, 2015 2:39 pm

A very well done you sir! :clap: :clap: claim your prize! ('K')
Cheers,
Tom.

BIGGEST IS ALWAYS BEST ;)

Built: Tiger Tank, Bismarck, 'O' gauge Canal boats.
Currently building: Lancaster Bomber, DC-3, 00 gauge model railway, Wasa
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby Mark » Sat May 23, 2015 3:33 pm

Thanks ! But it wasn't the hardest question in the world, to be quite honest :lol:
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Re: Pair of '0' gauge (1/48th scale) working Narrowboats

Postby steve131 » Sun May 24, 2015 9:27 pm

Great work on the step and particularly the bed :clap: How come you had left over track pins, i never did :( .Where do you get your plasticard from Mr Models don't usually have any when i look :angry-banghead: .
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