D-Day invasion stripes

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D-Day invasion stripes

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D-Day invasion stripes

Postby snapdragon » Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:17 pm

Here is some data for modellers for putting on D-D invasion stripes for 1/32 and 1/24 aircraft.

Everybody spends hours masking these things but originally they were painted on by hand with whatever was around with very little masking so depending on the ground crew some could be distinctly odd. Remember that the orders went out on June 3/4 (invasion should have been the 5th June) so that the Germans didn't realise something was going to happen.

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Here's the numbers. I have converted to Metric to make measuring easier.

1/32 Single engine aircraft

Bands to be 18 inches wide on both wings and fuselage. this equates to the following.

band width 1.42875cm for ease call this 1.4 cm.

Placement
Fuselage bands to start 18 inches from leading edge of tail plane - 1.4cm.
Wing bands to finish 6 inches from National insignia = 0.47625cm. Rounded up call it 0.5

1/32 Twin Engine aircraft

Bands to be 24 inches = 1.905cm

Placement
Wing stripes to start outboard of Engine Nacelles.
Fuselage stripes to start 18 inches from leading edge of tailplane = 1.4cm


1/24 scale single engine

18 inch band width = 1.905cm

Placement
Fuselage bands to start 18 inches from leading edge of tail plane - 1.905cm.
Wing bands to finish 6 inches from National insignia = 0.635cm
1/24 twin engine aircraft

24 inch band width = 1.905cm

Placement
24 inch bands to start outboard of engine nacelles on wings
Fuselage placement - 18 inches from tailplane = 1.905cm

That should give you all a good and accurate place guide. Up to you if you want to mask or not!
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Re: D-Day invasion stripes

Postby Gundog » Tue Oct 06, 2015 10:27 am

Nice one Snap. I've never understood why people spend hours getting these absolutely straight, then wax lyrical about replicating weathering and combat damage!
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Building: Hachette Bismarck, DeAgostini Sovereign of the Seas, 74 Sqn. tribute, Tamiya 1/32 Mosquito FBVI

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Re: D-Day invasion stripes

Postby steve131 » Tue Oct 06, 2015 7:57 pm

Great info Snapdragons, would a Judge in a competition mark you down for wobbly lines :think:
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Re: D-Day invasion stripes

Postby snapdragon » Sun Oct 18, 2015 10:37 pm

That's a very good question steve.

My answer would be to have documentary evidence, especially if you were modelling a particular aircraft from a particular squadron on a particular day.

To not be "marked down" I would have a copy of a photograph showing that aircraft next to my model. If you have been good enough to replicate it really well there is no need for a judge to fault your painting or marking abilities.

What you must remember is that although initially the stripes were painted by hand at the last minute (some going on after midnight on June 6th itself) The neatness depended on the ground crews that were doing it. Aircraft of Squadron commanders and up were usually more neater then the rest of the squadrons (no ground crew wants to incur the anger of their CO and upwards for a sloppy paint job).

Also bear in mind that when aircraft had their overhauls or battle damage repairs and a repaint was needed then everything would be measured out and masked off properly.

This is why I never enter competitions, because you are subject to the knowledge and opinions of one man.... and they don't know everything about every subject. I would rather have my work judged by lots of other modellers.

I did enter a competition once with my revell 1/32 arado floatplane (it's on here somewhere). The paints I used were matched to RLM paints used for Kreigsmarine and maritime aircraft for the upper surface and splinter pattern. The cockpit was RLM 66 - correct for Maritime aircraft 1n 1941 and the lower colour - RLM 65 is also correct. As part of my display I put a copy of a rare colour photo of the aircraft and paint chips. The judge on his critiqe form wrote "incorrect colours on aircraft!"

Never entered a competition since!
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